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Easy Pandesal Recipe (Soft and Chewy Filipino Bread Rolls)

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An easy pandesal recipe so you can make the quintessential Filipino bread roll at home any time the craving hits. It’s crunchy outside, soft and chewy inside, perfect with butter or dipped in your morning coffee.

(If you prefer your morning bread a little jazzed up, try this soft cheesy ensaymada, these ube bread rolls or treat yourself to Spanish bread. They’re all delicious!)

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

Are you a Filipino living abroad like me? Then you’re probably thinking why bother making pandesal at home when you can get them pretty easily at the Asian supermarket.

One reason: nothing beats the smell of freshly baked pandesal filling your kitchen.

And it’s not just any smell. It’s THE smell.

One sniff of freshly baked pandesal and I’m back at my nanay’s dining table, eating pandesal filled with Lily’s Peanut Butter that she prepared for me after school.

Or it’s a Sunday morning and I’m happily eating pandesal (out of those little brown paper bags) that my mom bought from the local panaderia after church.

Not a Filipino? Then you are in for a treat. 

Unlike dinner rolls or the regular loaves of bread we get here, this pandesal recipe is egg and butter-free, has a very subtle hint of sugar and salt, crunchy outside and soft inside.

It’s certainly unique and absolutely delicious. Give it a go and find out why Filipinos all over the world love it.

What is pandesal bread?

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

So what is pandesal bread? Wikipedia puts it very simply as “salt bread”.

Ironically, it’s more sweet than salty. And it has a really rich history for such a humble bread. Check this out if you’re so inclined, it’s quite an interesting read.

And there are different kinds of pandesal; I dare say it’s as varied as the number of islands in the Philippines (and that’s a lot)!

So I can’t claim that this pandesal recipe is for the traditional pandesal; I’ve eaten different kinds (big, small, light, dense) to know that each province, town or city probably has their own version so there’s technically no traditional kind.

What I can say is that this is the pandesal bread I grew up eating. Crunchy, soft, sweet and salty all at once. 

It’s not fluffy like dinner rolls; it’s not dense like wheat bread. It has just the perfect bite to it that’s uniquely pandesal bread.

Easy pandesal recipe for beginners

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

I’ve looked around for pandesal recipes for a long time and this is the result of me tweaking and trying to make it easier. And it is.

I’m a self-taught home baker like you and I like shortcuts as much as the next person so if I can make this beloved Filipino bread at home, you can too.

If you look at the recipe, it’s just a lot of steps but they are easy, baby steps. Manageable steps to make the whole process that much more achievable.

And don’t worry – I’ve been baking pandesal using this recipe for years now and it comes out perfect every time. The best pandesal recipe!

Let’s get to it.

Ingredients for pandesal recipe

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The main ingredients are pantry staples:

  • Sugar
  • Oil
  • Salt
  • Flour

Pandesal is yeast-based so you’ll need to buy some. I like using active dry yeast vs. instant yeast (more on that below) and this is the brand I always use.

You might be surprised to see that bread crumbs are involved too. That’s what makes pandesal so unique. I use plain breadcrumbs.

Tools you need to make Filipino bread rolls

The tools you need are simple as well — just bowls and baking pans. I don’t use a mixer and stir everything by hand.

If you do own a stand mixer with the hook attachment, or a food processor with a dough blade, you can use those.

I just choose to stir and knead the pandesal dough by hand because it gives me greater control and I have less chance of over-kneading it.

I’ve found that the most helpful kitchen gadgets when making pandesal are:

How to bake a pandesal

For the detailed recipe, scroll to the bottom of the page for the printer-friendly recipe card with nutritional information.

Now that we have our ingredients and tools ready, we can get baking.

Phase 1: proof yeast

In a medium sized bowl, stir warm water, active dry yeast and granulated sugar until dissolved. Set aside and let stand until bubbly (about 10 minutes).

Phase 2: work on dough

In a large bowl, stir sugar and oil until fully combined. 

Add salt, your yeast mixture from phase 1, and 1 cup of flour. Stir until incorporated. Proceed to add the rest of your flour 1/2 cup at a time combining well after each addition.

Once the dough starts pulling and sticking together in a ball, transfer it into a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic (8-10 minutes). When in doubt, knead some more.

Phase 3: rise and divide

Oil a large bowl with canola or vegetable oil. Place your dough in the bowl and turn to ensure the whole dough is coated.

Cover with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and allow to rise in a dry warm place (about 90F) until it doubles in size (about 2 hours).

Once the dough is ready, turn the dough into a lightly floured surface and knead slightly. Weigh the dough and divide into 32 pieces. 

Easy Pandesal Recipe

Shape each piece into an oval, like an egg, and place onto a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan (you would need two baking pans, 16 pieces of pandesal per pan). 

Make sure to keep about a quarter inch space around each piece to allow them to rise further.

Cover each baking pan with a damp cloth and allow to rise a second time (about an hour).

Phase 4: bake

Preheat your oven to 375F. 

Sprinkle bread crumbs on top of the pandesal and bake until golden brown (15-20 minutes). 

Easy Pandesal Recipe

Pandesal baking tips and FAQs

Over the years, I’ve received plenty of questions from TUB readers about this pandesal recipe so I’ve decided to collate them all here.

What makes pandesal bread soft and fluffy

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

There are several factors that affect the softness and chewiness of pandesal like yeast, moisture in the dough and proper kneading.

For soft pandesal:

  • Make sure that your dough is not too dry. This pandesal dough is supposed to be on the stickier side; don’t be tempted to add too much flour or you will end up with dense bread.
  • Proof your yeast. One of the reasons why I prefer using active dry yeast vs. instant yeast is I always need to proof it, i.e. ensure the yeast is still active, before adding it to my dough. If your yeast stays flat and doesn’t bubble after 10 minutes, it’s old and you need a fresh batch.
  • Knead the dough enough. Kneading improves the structure of the dough, making it stretchy and pliable, and forming a structure that will trap air for a proper rise. Under-worked dough won’t have that and will result to dry, dense bread.
  • Don’t knead the dough too much. Kneading the dough by hand rarely results to over kneading but is possible if you’re using your stand mixer. Once you get that perfectly elastic but still slightly sticky dough, stop.

Why is my pandesal hard and dense

Your pandesal is hard and dense most likely because:

  • The dough became too dry because of too much flour
  • Yeast used is stale
  • Dough was kneaded too much, or not enough
  • Bread was over-baked

See the notes above for more information on how to make pandesal soft.

How do I know if I’ve kneaded the dough enough

The most common way of testing if your dough has been kneaded enough is doing the “windowpane test”.

All this means is you pull off a small piece of dough and stretch it thin; if the gluten is well-developed, the dough will stretch into a paper-thin film without breaking. If it quickly breaks you need to keep kneading.

Here are more ways to tell when dough is kneaded enough.

I know some bakers like to use the dough hook of their stand mixers to knead their bread dough and that’s fine. 

I prefer to knead by hand because there’s less chance of over-kneading. And there’s really something very relaxing about it! 

How to have evenly sized pandesal

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

I get evenly sized pandesal by weighing the dough and dividing the weight by 32. I then ensure each piece of my pandesal is that exact weight. 

To do this, you’ll need to invest in a kitchen scale. This is true for all baking, actually. 

While you can get away with volume measurements with a lot of recipes, bread making is more exact so it’s always better to weigh your ingredients. 

We bought our kitchen scale years ago for less than $20 and it’s one of the most used gadgets in our kitchen.

How long can you keep pandesal

Pandesal bread is best eaten fresh out of the oven. Freshly baked, hot pandesal is so very good. 

They will last for up to 2 days on your counter in an airtight container.

If you plan to keep them for longer, freezing is a better option.

Just place the pandesal in a freezer-safe container (we use a Ziploc bag) and put in the freezer. Then simply pop into your toaster to enjoy; no need to thaw.

Can I use bread flour

I’ve personally never used bread flour to bake bread. I always use all-purpose flour because that’s what I always have on hand. And I’ve had great success with it.

So if you don’t have bread flour, no worries. You can use all-purpose flour and make very tasty bread out of it.

I did read that the higher percentage of gluten in bread flour (somewhere between 11-14%) makes it ideal for bread because it makes the dough more elastic and easier to work, resulting to lighter textured breads.

So if you’re curious, you can substitute all-purpose flour for bread flour easily. It’s a 1:1 substitution. You can read all about it and the different kinds of flour here.

A quick note that not all all-purpose flours are the same though.

For example, the all-purpose flour we get here in Canada is higher in protein than the equivalent product in the US. So, when milled and used to bake bread, Canadian flour can “feel stronger and more elastic than an equivalent American flour, which will feel softer.”

Our little factoid of the day and something to keep in mind.

Sticky dough: tips

If your dough is sticky in the bowl as you’re stirring it, add flour a little at a time until it sticks together in a ball. Not too much though, or you’ll end up with very dense bread.

If it’s sticky while you’re kneading it, avoid the temptation to add even more flour. Instead, try kneading with slightly damp hands.

Proofing yeast: tips

Remember that yeast is a living thing and proofing is simply ensuring that your yeast is alive and active. 

In this pandesal recipe, we use active dry yeast, which needs to be proofed. Note that rapid-rise yeast, instant yeast, or bread machine yeast don’t need to be, else they will lose their fast-rising ability.

Step 1: Mix yeast and warm water. The temperature of the water is important. It should feel warm but not hot. If you measure the temperature with a thermometer, it should be about 110F. Hotter than that and you’ll end up killing the yeast.

Step 2: Add sugar and stir. The yeast loves sugar and will gobble it up. If you watch the bowl or cup, you will actually see movement and this is the point when you will start to see bubbles and foam from the carbon dioxide that is forming. 

Proofing usually takes about 10 minutes. If your mixture has no bubbles after this time, your yeast is old or stale. You’ll need to start with fresh yeast. 

And unfortunately, there’s no way to revive old yeast.

Making the dough rise: tips

A lot of recipes say to allow the dough to rise until “double in size”.

Depending on the recipe, this can range from 30 minutes to 2 hours. Just check in at the halfway mark so you can get an indication of how much longer you have to go.

For me, what’s important is finding the proper place to leave my dough. 

It’s cold here most of the year so leaving my bowl on our not-so-warm counter is not exactly ideal. 

So what I like to do is turn my oven on to its lowest setting for a few minutes, then turn it off so that it’ll be about 90F when I’m ready to put my dough in to rise.

Just remember to remove the dough from the oven when you’re ready to preheat for baking.

And do you really need a damp cloth to cover your dough while rising? I do but it’s not necessary. Sometimes I use plastic wrap. And other bakers I know use pot lids.

The key is covering the bowl with something because doing so helps the dough retain moisture and prevents it from drying out.

Have more questions? Leave me a comment below.

Do you really want to know the secret in making the best pandesal ever though? Just enjoy the process! The kneading. The smell. The anticipation.

Being the unlikely baker that I am, I never imagined myself baking my own pandesal. Ever. 

So every time I make it, and eat it, and realize how good it is, I’m always amazed at how far I’ve come. My spouse is astounded. I think my sister is just always in utter shock lol. 

Making pandesal is special. It’s very personal to me, almost magical. Hope you enjoy it too!

Pandesal Recipe (Filipino Bread Rolls)

Easy Pandesal Recipe (Soft and Chewy Filipino Bread Rolls)

Author: Jolina
An easy pandesal recipe so you can make the quintessential Filipino bread roll at home any time the craving hits. It’s crunchy outside, soft and chewy inside, perfect with butter or dipped in your morning coffee.
5 from 10 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Resting Time 3 hrs
Total Time 3 hrs 45 mins
Course Breakfast, Brunch
Cuisine Filipino
Servings 32 rolls
Calories 125 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

Phase 1:

Phase 2:

Phase 3:

Phase 4:

Instructions
 

Phase 1:

  • In a medium sized bowl, stir 2 cups warm water, 2 teaspoons active dry yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar until dissolved. Set aside and let stand until bubbly (about 10 minutes).
    Easy Pandesal Recipe

Phase 2:

  • In a large bowl, stir ⅔ cup sugar and ¼ cup oil until fully combined.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Add 2 teaspoons salt, your yeast mixture and 1 cup flour. Stir until incorporated.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Proceed to add the rest of your flour ½ cup at a time combining well after each addition.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Once the dough starts pulling and sticking together in a ball, transfer it into a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic (8-10 minutes). When in doubt, knead some more.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe

Phase 3:

  • Oil a large bowl with 1 tablespoon oil. Place your dough in the bowl and turn to ensure the whole dough is coated. Cover with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and allow to rise in a dry warm place (about 90F) until it doubles in size (about 2 hours).
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Once the dough is ready, turn the dough into a lightly floured surface and knead slightly. Weigh the dough and divide into 32 pieces.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Shape each piece into an oval, like an egg, and place onto a lightly greased 9×13 inch baking pan (you would need two pans – 16 pieces per sheet). Make sure to keep about a quarter inch space around each piece to allow them to rise further.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe
  • Cover each baking sheet with a damp cloth and allow to rise a second time (about an hour).
    Easy Pandesal Recipe

Phase 4:

  • Preheat your oven to 375F. Sprinkle bread crumbs on top of the pandesal and bake until golden brown (15-20 minutes). Since you're using 2 baking sheets, you may want to rotate/switch the pans midway through.
    Easy Pandesal Recipe

Video

Notes

  1. This pandesal recipe requires 6 cups of flour. However, if you think you’ve added enough and your dough is getting too dry, you can stop. No need to add all 6 cups.
  2. This pandesal dough is meant to be on the stickier side though; so only go over the 6 cups of flour if your dough is very, very sticky and wet.
  3. For best results, weigh ingredients using a kitchen scale.
  4. When kneading the dough, you want a lightly floured surface. You can add a little more flour to make kneading more manageable but don’t add too much. Try kneading with damp hands instead.
  5. See the post for the complete step-by-step photos and a lot more tips for making perfect pandesal every time.

Nutrition

Calories: 125kcalCarbohydrates: 22gProtein: 2gFat: 2gSodium: 152mgPotassium: 29mgSugar: 4gCalcium: 6mgIron: 1.1mg

Nutritional information are estimates only.

Keyword Authentic, Classic Recipe, Easy, No-Fail Recipe
Tried this recipe?Tag @iamtheunlikelybaker I’d love to see your creations!

Happy baking!

Did you make pandesal (Filipino bread rolls)? I’d love to hear from you in the comments section below.

And let’s get social! Find me on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

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Recipe Rating




Neil

Tuesday 21st of July 2020

Hi, the recipe makes alot of bread rolls. But will it be okay to store of the dough inside the fridge? How many days can i keep it inside the fridge?

Jolina

Wednesday 22nd of July 2020

Hi Neil, I haven't tried but you can definitely freeze the bread dough. Here's a useful guide on how to do it: https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-freeze-yeast-bread-dough-427560

Marie

Sunday 28th of June 2020

I’ve been trying to make pandesal for a while now but kept getting the same results- dense, heavy bread. I couldn’t figure out what I was doing wrong. This recipe made all the difference. Adding flour gradually was key. I did not use all 6 cups. I finally got soft and light bread. I will continue to practice until I master this. Thanks

MichelleS

Thursday 10th of December 2020

Is the dough really this sticky? Help!

Jolina

Friday 3rd of July 2020

That's awesome Marie! Enjoy :)

Boj

Wednesday 20th of May 2020

This is so relatable "One sniff of freshly baked pandesal and I’m back at my nanay’s dining table, eating pandesal filled with Lily’s Peanut Butter that she prepared for me after school." Will try your recipe later!

Jolina

Thursday 21st of May 2020

:) Enjoy!

Jenny Natalicio

Sunday 17th of May 2020

This is my first time to try it. It came out great! So fluffy. I just need to figure out the size but I read how you weigh it in another comment so I will try that next time. These taste so yummy!!!

Jolina

Tuesday 19th of May 2020

Happy to hear that Jenny! :)

Melanie

Saturday 16th of May 2020

Hi there! I made this and was really tasty. However, the bottom ended up being crispy almost burnt. How do I avoid that for next time? Thanks!

Jolina

Tuesday 19th of May 2020

Hi Melanie! There are several reasons why this can happen sometimes e.g. oven doesn't heat evenly, has hot spots, baking pan too thin, dark pan vs shiny aluminum pan etc. First thing I'd do is invest in an oven thermometer so you can be sure you're baking at the right temp. Are you using a dark non-stick pan? Next time try to reduce the temperature by 25 degrees, see if that helps.